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STRANGE AND AMAZING FACTS ABOUT MARIJUANA YOU JUST CANT MAKE THIS STUFF UP - PART 1

Attack a Women Are the What Men? in vs Symptoms Heart of

akadem222
13.08.2018

Content:

  • Attack a Women Are the What Men? in vs Symptoms Heart of
  • The heart attack gender gap
  • How Men and Women Experience Heart Attacks Differently?
  • If you ask about the symptoms of a heart attack, most people think of chest pain. Over the last couple of decades, however, scientists have. As with men, women's most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the. Many people are unaware that heart attack symptoms in women can be quite Symptoms of a Heart Attack -- in Both Men and Women.

    Attack a Women Are the What Men? in vs Symptoms Heart of

    Women's symptoms may occur more often when women are resting, or even when they're asleep. Mental stress also may trigger heart attack symptoms in women. Women tend to show up in emergency rooms after heart damage has already occurred because their symptoms are not those usually associated with a heart attack, and because women may downplay their symptoms.

    If you experience these symptoms or think you're having a heart attack, call for emergency medical help immediately. Don't drive yourself to the emergency room unless you have no other options. Although several traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease — such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity — affect women and men, other factors may play a bigger role in the development of heart disease in women.

    For example, risk factors may include:. High blood pressure or diabetes during pregnancy can increase women's long-term risk of high blood pressure and diabetes and increase the risk of development of heart disease in the mothers. Some research has found that if you had pregnancy complications such as high blood pressure or diabetes your children may also have an increased risk of heart disease in the future.

    Women with inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, may also have a higher risk of heart disease. Research is ongoing in other heart disease risk factors in women. Women of all ages should take heart disease seriously. Women under the age of 65, and especially those with a family history of heart disease, need to pay close attention to heart disease risk factors. Women also need to take prescribed medications appropriately, such as blood pressure medications, blood thinners and aspirin.

    And they'll need to better manage other conditions that are risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. In general, everybody should do moderate exercise, such as walking at a brisk pace, on most days of the week. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity, 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week, or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity.

    That's about 30 minutes a day, five days a week. For even more health benefits, aim for minutes of moderate aerobic activity or minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week. That's about 60 minutes a day, five days a week. In addition, aim to do strength training exercises two or more days a week.

    If you can't get all of your exercise completed in one session, try breaking up your physical activity into several minute sessions during a day.

    You'll still get the same heart-health benefits. Interval training — in which you alternate short bursts of intense activity with intervals of lighter activity — is another exercise alternative you might try.

    For example, you could incorporate short bursts of jogging or fast walking into your regular walks. Interval training may help you burn more calories than continuous exercise, and it can help you maintain a healthy weight and keep your heart healthy.

    You can make other small changes to increase your physical activity throughout the day. For example, try taking the stairs instead of the elevator, walking or riding your bicycle to work or to do errands, or doing situps or pushups while watching television.

    What's considered a healthy weight varies from person to person, but having a normal body mass index BMI is helpful.

    BMI is a measurement calculated from height and weight. It helps you see if you have a healthy or unhealthy percentage of body fat. A BMI of 25 or higher can be associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Waist circumference also is a useful tool to measure whether or not you're overweight.

    Women are generally considered overweight if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches 89 centimeters. Losing even a small amount of weight can help by lowering your blood pressure and reducing your risk of diabetes — both of which increase your risk of heart disease. Generally, heart disease treatment in women and in men is similar. Treatment may include medications, angioplasty and stenting, or coronary bypass surgery. Angioplasty and stenting, commonly used treatments for heart attack, are effective for both men and women.

    However, women who don't have typical chest pain are less likely to be offered these potentially lifesaving options. And, in women, if heart symptoms are mainly caused by coronary microvascular disease, treatment generally includes healthy lifestyle changes and medications. Guidelines from the American Heart Association AHA urge women to be more aggressive about cutting their cardiovascular disease risk.

    For some women, this includes a daily aspirin. But, the routine use of daily aspirin therapy to prevent heart disease in low-risk women younger than 65 years old isn't recommended. Doctors may recommend that women older than 65 years take a daily milligram aspirin to help prevent heart disease if their blood pressure is controlled and the risk of digestive bleeding is low. Aspirin might also be considered for at-risk women younger than 65 years for stroke prevention.

    But, don't start taking aspirin for heart disease prevention on your own. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking aspirin based on your individual risk factor. Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below.

    Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. This content does not have an English version.

    This content does not have an Arabic version. Heart disease in women: Understand symptoms and risk factors. Free E-newsletter Subscribe to Housecall Our general interest e-newsletter keeps you up to date on a wide variety of health topics. Understand symptoms and risk factors All women face the threat of heart disease. By Mayo Clinic Staff. References How does heart disease affect women? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    Accessed May 18, Heart attack symptoms in women. Clinical features and diagnosis of coronary heart disease in women. Douglas PS, et al. Overview of cardiovascular risk factors in women. Management of coronary heart disease in women.

    Garcia M, et al. Cardiovascular disease in women: Mosca L, et al. Effectiveness-based guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in women update: That's about 60 minutes a day, five days a week. In addition, aim to do strength training exercises two or more days a week. If you can't get all of your exercise completed in one session, try breaking up your physical activity into several minute sessions during a day.

    You'll still get the same heart-health benefits. Interval training — in which you alternate short bursts of intense activity with intervals of lighter activity — is another exercise alternative you might try. For example, you could incorporate short bursts of jogging or fast walking into your regular walks.

    Interval training may help you burn more calories than continuous exercise, and it can help you maintain a healthy weight and keep your heart healthy.

    You can make other small changes to increase your physical activity throughout the day. For example, try taking the stairs instead of the elevator, walking or riding your bicycle to work or to do errands, or doing situps or pushups while watching television. What's considered a healthy weight varies from person to person, but having a normal body mass index BMI is helpful.

    BMI is a measurement calculated from height and weight. It helps you see if you have a healthy or unhealthy percentage of body fat. A BMI of 25 or higher can be associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Waist circumference also is a useful tool to measure whether or not you're overweight.

    Women are generally considered overweight if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches 89 centimeters. Losing even a small amount of weight can help by lowering your blood pressure and reducing your risk of diabetes — both of which increase your risk of heart disease.

    Generally, heart disease treatment in women and in men is similar. Treatment may include medications, angioplasty and stenting, or coronary bypass surgery. Angioplasty and stenting, commonly used treatments for heart attack, are effective for both men and women.

    However, women who don't have typical chest pain are less likely to be offered these potentially lifesaving options. And, in women, if heart symptoms are mainly caused by coronary microvascular disease, treatment generally includes healthy lifestyle changes and medications. Guidelines from the American Heart Association AHA urge women to be more aggressive about cutting their cardiovascular disease risk. For some women, this includes a daily aspirin.

    But, the routine use of daily aspirin therapy to prevent heart disease in low-risk women younger than 65 years old isn't recommended. Doctors may recommend that women older than 65 years take a daily milligram aspirin to help prevent heart disease if their blood pressure is controlled and the risk of digestive bleeding is low.

    Aspirin might also be considered for at-risk women younger than 65 years for stroke prevention. But, don't start taking aspirin for heart disease prevention on your own. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking aspirin based on your individual risk factor. Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below.

    Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised.

    A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. This content does not have an English version. This content does not have an Arabic version. Heart disease in women: Understand symptoms and risk factors. Free E-newsletter Subscribe to Housecall Our general interest e-newsletter keeps you up to date on a wide variety of health topics.

    Understand symptoms and risk factors All women face the threat of heart disease. By Mayo Clinic Staff. References How does heart disease affect women? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Accessed May 18, Heart attack symptoms in women.

    Clinical features and diagnosis of coronary heart disease in women. Douglas PS, et al. Overview of cardiovascular risk factors in women. Management of coronary heart disease in women. Garcia M, et al. Cardiovascular disease in women: Mosca L, et al. Effectiveness-based guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in women update: A guideline from the American Heart Association.

    Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Mehta LS, et al. Acute myocardial infarction in women: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Department of Health and Human Services. Accessed May 25, American College of Sports Medicine. Accessed May 26, Weston M, et al. Effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training HIT on fitness in adults: A meta-analysis of controlled and non-controlled trials. What is coronary microvascular disease? Accessed June 1, Park K, et al.

    Adverse pregnancy conditions, infertility, and future cardiovascular risk: Implications for mother and child. Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy. Mankad R expert opinion.

    The heart attack gender gap

    Feb. 18, -- Both men and women can have common heart attack symptoms and ones that aren't typical. Learn to spot the warnings signs so you can seek. Men are more likely to have chest pain, while women's symptoms can be more varied. Gender plays a role in the symptoms, treatments, and outcomes of some common heart diseases. Find out how men and women are affected.

    How Men and Women Experience Heart Attacks Differently?



    Comments

    spiris

    Feb. 18, -- Both men and women can have common heart attack symptoms and ones that aren't typical. Learn to spot the warnings signs so you can seek.

    mimisnewg

    Men are more likely to have chest pain, while women's symptoms can be more varied.

    pafak3

    Gender plays a role in the symptoms, treatments, and outcomes of some common heart diseases. Find out how men and women are affected.

    tryost

    “Both women and men may have typical symptoms of heart attack, including chest pain or pressure often radiating to the shoulders, arms, neck.

    Supre

    Although heart disease may often be thought of as a problem for men, heart disease is the most common cause of death for both women and men in the United.

    Bentley

    Consequently, women ignore or downplay their heart attack symptoms until it is too late. What is a heart attack? A heart attack (or myocardial infarction) occurs.

    Add Comment