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How Can CBD Benefit Your Dog

administration 2.5 Gel

misa18
18.06.2018

Content:

  • administration 2.5 Gel
  • Adapalene and Benzoyl Peroxide Gel
  • Before using ketoprofen gel
  • Ketoprofen % w/w Gel - Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) by Pinewood Healthcare. Posology and method of administration. For cutaneous. Epiduo %/% Gel - Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) by Benzoyl Peroxide 25 mg (%) Posology and method of administration. Epiduo. The diazepam rectal gel mg dose may also be used as a partial replacement dose for patients who may expel a portion of the first dose.

    administration 2.5 Gel

    Instruct patient on proper instillation of eye ointment. Do not to touch the tip of the tube to the eye, fingertips, or other surface. Antibiotic therapy can result in superinfection or suprainfection with non susceptible organisms. Overgrowth of Candida can occur with erythromycin therapy. Patients should be monitored closely during therapy. Erythromycin does not treat viral infection e.

    Prescribing erythromycin in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection or a prophylactic indication is unlikely to provide benefit to the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

    Patients should be told to complete the full course of treatment, even if they feel better earlier. Patients who have shown macrolide hypersensitivity or sensitivity to any macrolide antibiotic should not be given erythromycin.

    Erythromycin can cause rare, but serious allergic reactions, including angioedema and anaphylaxis. There is a risk of cross sensitivity with other macrolide antibiotics. Erythromycin is excreted mainly by the liver.

    Patients with impaired hepatic or biliary function should receive erythromycin with caution. Hepatic function should be monitored in patients receiving prolonged treatment with erythromycin. The estolate salt of erythromycin should not be used in patients with hepatic disease because of the potential for hepatotoxicity. Almost all antibacterial agents, including erythromycin, have been associated with pseudomembranous colitis antibiotic-associated colitis which may range in severity from mild to life-threatening.

    In the colon, overgrowth of Clostridia may exist when normal flora is altered subsequent to antibacterial administration. The toxin produced by Clostridium difficile is a primary cause of pseudomembranous colitis. It is known that systemic use of antibiotics predisposes patients to development of pseudomembranous colitis. Consideration should be given to the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis in patients presenting with diarrhea following antibacterial administration.

    Erythromycin should be prescribed with caution to patients with inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or other GI disease. If diarrhea develops during therapy, the drug should be discontinued. Following diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis, therapeutic measures should be instituted.

    In milder cases, the colitis may respond to discontinuation of the offending agent. In moderate to severe cases, fluids and electrolytes, protein supplementation, and treatment with an antibacterial effective against Clostridium difficile may be warranted.

    Products inhibiting peristalsis are contraindicated in this clinical situation. Practitioners should be aware that antibiotic-associated colitis has been observed to occur over two months or more following discontinuation of systemic antibiotic therapy; a careful medical history should be taken.

    Erythromycin is classified as pregnancy category B. Observational studies in pregnant women have reported cardiovascular malformations after exposure to erythromycin in early pregnancy. Erythromycin use was also associated with an increased risk of urinary system malformations aOR 2. The effect of erythromycin on labor and obstetric delivery unknown. According to the manufacturer, erythromycin should be used with caution in breast-feeding mothers because it is excreted into breast milk.

    A prospective observational study assessing the safety of macrolide antibiotics during lactation found that The adverse event rate was similar to that seen in babies in a control group whose mothers were treated with amoxicillin 8. A population based cohort study found that babies diagnosed with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis were 2. The American Academy of Pediatrics AAP considers erythromycin to be a medication that is usually compatible with breast-feeding; azithromycin and clarithromycin have not been evaluated by the AAP.

    Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding baby experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally ingested drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    The systemic use of erythromycin can rarely cause reversible loss of hearing or hearing impairment. Older adults, especially patients with renal or hepatic function impairment, may be at increased risk for developing hearing loss.

    There have been reports of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis IHPS occurring in infants following erythromycin therapy.

    A possible dose-response effect was described with an absolute risk of IHPS of 5. Since erythromycin may be used in the treatment of conditions in infants which are associated with significant mortality or morbidity such as pertussis or neonatal Chlamydia trachomatis infections , the benefit of erythromycin therapy needs to be weighed against the potential risk of developing IHPS.

    Parents should be informed to contact their physician if vomiting or irritability with feeding occurs. Many formulations of erythromycin lactobionate injection contain benzyl alcohol as a preservative. These preparations containing benzyl alcohol should be avoided when possible in neonates because benzyl alcohol has been associated with 'gasping syndrome', a potentially fatal condition.

    Benzyl alcohol may also cause allergic reactions, therefore, parenteral erythromycin formulations should not be used in patients with benzyl alcohol hypersensitivity. Systemic erythromycin has been reported to cause QT prolongation resulting in ventricular arrhythmias of the torsade de pointes type. Fatalities have been reported. Erythromycin should be avoided in patients with known QT prolongation or in patients with ongoing proarrhythmic conditions such as uncorrected electrolyte imbalance hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia , clinically significant bradycardia, and in patients receiving Class 1A or Class III antiarrhythmic agents.

    Elderly patients may also be more susceptible to the development of torsades de pointes than younger patients. Use erythromycin with caution in patients with cardiac disease or other conditions that may increase the risk of QT prolongation including cardiac arrhythmias, congenital long QT syndrome, heart failure, myocardial infarction, hypertension, coronary artery disease, or in patients receiving medications known to prolong the QT interval or cause electrolyte imbalances.

    Females, the elderly, patients with diabetes mellitus, thyroid disease, malnutrition, alcoholism, or hepatic impairment may also be at increased risk for QT prolongation. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias have also been reported in humans with idiopathic long QT syndrome. Electrolyte abnormalities should be corrected prior to therapy. Erythromycin should be used cautiously in patients with a seizure disorder.

    There have been rare reports of seizures during erythromycin therapy. Use with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Two case reports suggest that erythromycin may aggravate the weakness of patients with myasthenia gravis. While erythromycin may be used to treat certain sexually transmitted diseases STD , the drug may mask or delay the symptoms of incubating gonorrhea or syphilis when given as part of an STD treatment regimen. Initiate appropriate therapy and perform follow-up testing as recommended based upon sexually transmitted disease diagnosis.

    Geriatric patients, especially those with renal or hepatic function impairment, may be at increased risk for developing hearing loss from systemic erythromycin; hearing impairment is a rare side effect.

    Elderly patients may be more susceptible to development of QT prolongation or torsade de pointes arrhythmias than younger patients. According to OBRA, use of antibiotics should be limited to confirmed or suspected bacterial infections. Antibiotics are non-selective and may result in the eradication of beneficial microorganisms while promoting the emergence of undesired ones, causing secondary infections such as oral thrush, colitis, or vaginitis.

    Any antibiotic may cause diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and hypersensitivity reactions. Major Since abarelix can cause QT prolongation, abarelix should be used cautiously, if at all, with other drugs that are associated with QT prolongation, such as erythromycin.

    Moderate Monitor for an increase in abemaciclib-related adverse reactions if coadministration with erythromycin is necessary; consider reducing the dose of abemaciclib in mg decrements if toxicities occur.

    Discontinue abemaciclib for patients unable to tolerate 50 mg twice daily. Coadministration with other moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors is predicted to increase the relative potency adjusted unbound AUC of abemaciclib plus its active metabolites M2, M18, and M20 by approximately 1.

    Major Decrease the acalabrutinib dose to mg PO once daily if coadministered with erythromycin. Coadministration may result in increased acalabrutinib exposure and toxicity e. Moderate Inhibitors of the hepatic CYPA2, such as erythromycin, may inhibit the hepatic oxidative metabolism of caffeine. No specific management is recommended except in patients who complain of caffeine related side effects. In such patients, the dosage of caffeine containing medications or the ingestion of caffeine containing products may need to be reduced.

    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: Moderate Concomitant use of codeine with erythromycin may increase codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6, increased morphine concentrations, and prolonged opioid adverse reactions, including hypotension, respiratory depression, profound sedation, coma, and death.

    It is recommended to avoid this combination when codeine is being used for cough. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely at frequent intervals and consider a dosage reduction of codeine until stable drug effects are achieved. Discontinuation of erythromycin could decrease codeine plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to codeine.

    If erythromycin is discontinued, monitor the patient carefully and consider increasing the opioid dosage if appropriate. Erythromycin is a moderate inhibitor of CYP3A4.

    Moderate Concomitant use of dihydrocodeine with erythromycin may increase dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6, increased dihydromorphine concentrations, and prolonged opioid adverse reactions, including hypotension, respiratory depression, profound sedation, coma, and death. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely at frequent intervals and consider a dosage reduction of dihydrocodeine until stable drug effects are achieved.

    Discontinuation of erythromycin could decrease dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to dihydrocodeine. Erythromycin is a moderate inhibitor of CYP3A4, an isoenzyme partially responsible for the metabolism of dihydrocodeine.

    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: Moderate Concomitant use of hydrocodone with erythromycin may increase hydrocodone plasma concentrations and prolong opioid adverse reactions, including hypotension, respiratory depression, profound sedation, coma, and death. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely at frequent intervals and consider a dosage reduction of hydrocodone until stable drug effects are achieved.

    Discontinuation oferythromycin could decrease hydrocodone plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to hydrocodone. Iferythromycin is discontinued, monitor the patient carefully and consider increasing the opioid dosage if appropriate. Hydrocodone is a substrate for CYP3A4. Moderate Consider a reduced dose of oxycodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of erythromycin is necessary.

    If erythromycin is discontinued, consider increasing the oxycodone dose until stable drug effects are achieved and monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal.

    Oxycodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with a moderate inhibitor like erythromycin can increase oxycodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of oxycodone. If erythromycin is discontinued, oxycodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to oxycodone.

    Moderate Administration of CYP3A4 inhibitors such as erythromycin with tramadol may affect the metabolism of tramadol leading to altered tramadol exposure. Increased serum tramadol concentrations may occur. Moderate If the concomitant use of erythromycin and afatinib is necessary, monitor for afatinib-related adverse reactions. If the original dose of afatinib is not tolerated, consider reducing the daily dose of afatinib by 10 mg; resume the previous dose of afatinib as tolerated after discontinuation of erythromycin.

    The manufacturer of afatinib recommends permanent discontinuation of therapy for severe or intolerant adverse drug reactions at a dose of 20 mg per day, but does not address a minimum dose otherwise. Afatinib is a P-glycoprotein P-gp substrate and erythromycin is a P-gp inhibitor; coadministration may increase plasma concentrations of afatinib.

    Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with erythromycin include the beta-agonists. The effects of these beta-agonists on the cardiovascular system may be potentiated.

    Beta agonists infrequently produce cardiovascular adverse effects, mostly with high doses or in the setting of beta-agonist-induced hypokalemia. The concurrent use of erythromycin with alfentanil can significantly inhibit alfentanil clearance. As a result, the risk of prolonged or delayed respiratory depression may be increased.

    Monitor patients for adverse effects of alfentanil, such as hypotension, nausea, and itching. Smaller alfentanil doses may be needed if prolonged alfentanil administration is used Alfuzosin: Major Due to a possible risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP , alfuzosin and erythromycin should be used together cautiously. Based on electrophysiology studies performed by the manufacturer, alfuzosin may prolong the QT interval in a dose-dependent manner. The manufacturer warns that the QT effect of alfuzosin should be considered prior to administering the drug to patients taking other medications known to prolong the QT interval.

    Erythromycin administration is associated with QT prolongation and TdP. In addition, coadministration of erythromycin, a CYP3A4 inhibitor, with alfuzosin, a CYP3A4 substrate, may result in elevated alfuzosin plasma concentrations. Major Avoid administration of erythromycin and a calcium-channel blocker, particularly in geriatric patients. Coadministration has been associated with an increased risk of hypotension and shock.

    Azithromycin may be preferred if the use of a macrolide antibiotic is necessary in a patient receiving calcium-channel blocker therapy. Erythromycin may also decrease the clearance of calcium-channel blockers e. Concurrent use of erythromycin with diltiazem and verapamil has been associated with sudden cardiac death. This interaction is likely due to the combined inhibition of CYP3A by erythromycin and the calcium channel blockers leading to increases in the serum concentrations of erythromycin and the calcium channel blockers.

    Major Erythromycin may increase the systemic exposure of almotriptan. If coadministered, the recommended starting dose of almotriptan is 6. Avoid coadministration in patients with renal or hepatic impairment. Moderate Pharmacodynamic interactions between alosetron and drugs that enhance peristalsis are theoretically possible, based on opposing pharmacologic outcomes. It may be prudent to avoid use of erythromycin when used to enhance GI motility during alosetron treatment.

    Although a potential interaction has not been studied, erythromycin might negate the effect of alosetron. Caution and close monitoring are advised if these drugs are used together. Moderate Drugs that may inhibit CYP3A4, such as erythromycin, may inhibit the metabolism of alprazolam. Use alprazolam and erythromycin with caution and consider alprazolam dose reduction.

    Due to the extremely long half-life of amiodarone, a drug interaction is possible for days to weeks after discontinuation of amiodarone. In addition to potential pharmacokinetic interactions, erythromycin may cause QT prolongation and exhibit additive electrophysiologic effects with Class III antiarrhythmics. Concurrent use of erythromycin with amiodarone should be avoided. In addition, erythromycin may theoretically increase plasma concentrations of amiodarone via inhibition of CYP3A4.

    Higher antiarrhythmic plasma concentrations increases the potential risk of QT prolongation, TdP or other proarrhythmias. The risk of developing myopathy during therapy with atorvastatin is increased if coadministered with erythromycin, a CYP3A4 inhibitor.

    When possible, avoid concurrent use of HMG-reductase inhibitors with drugs known to increase the risk of developing rhabdomyolysis or acute renal failure. The serious risk of myopathy or rhabdomyolysis should be weighed carefully versus the benefits of combined atorvastatin and erythromycin therapy; there is no assurance that periodic monitoring of CK will prevent the occurrence of severe myopathy and renal damage.

    Moderate Erythromycin may be used to stimulate GI motility, such as in patients with diabetic gastroparesis. Some cyclic antidepressants with substantial antimuscarinic properties, such as amoxapine, may counteract erythromycin's effectiveness in enhancing GI motility. Major Both clarithromycin and erythromycin are macrolide antibiotics and coadministration would represent duplicate therapy. Additionally, coadministration may increase the risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP.

    Both drugs have been associated with QT prolongation and TdP. Major Torsades de pointes TdP and ventricular tachycardia have been reported during post-marketing use of anagrelide.

    A cardiovascular examination, including an ECG, should be obtained in all patients prior to initiating anagrelide therapy.

    Monitor patients during anagrelide therapy for cardiovascular effects and evaluate as necessary. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with anagrelide include erythromycin. Moderate Anticholinergics can antagonize the stimulatory effects of erythromycin on the GI tract when erythromycin is used therapeutically for improving GI motility.

    Avoid chronic administration of antimuscarinics along with prokinetic agents under most circumstances. Moderate Use apixaban and erythromycin together with caution in patients with significant renal dysfunction as risk of bleeding may be increased. Although serum concentrations of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants have been increased in the presence of moderate inhibitors, one cohort study found that the risk of bleeding was not increased. Major Due to the potential for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP , caution is advised when administering erythromycin with apomorphine.

    Erythromycin is associated with QT prolongation and TdP. Limited data indicate that QT prolongation is also possible with apomorphine; the change in QTc interval is not significant in most patients receiving dosages within the manufacturer's guidelines.

    In one study, a single mean dose of 5. Doses 6 mg SC do not provide additional clinical benefit and are not recommended. Major Avoid coadministration of erythromycin and aprepitant due to substantially increased exposure of aprepitant. Fosaprepitant is rapidly converted to aprepitant; therefore, a similar interaction is likely. If coadministration cannot be avoided, use caution, and monitor for an increase in aprepitant-related adverse effects for several days after administration of a multi-day aprepitant regimen.

    Coadministration of daily oral aprepitant mg, or 1. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with erythromycin include the long-acting beta-agonists LABAs. Major Because both erythromycin and aripiprazole are associated with a possible risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP , the combination should be used cautiously and with close monitoring.

    In addition, because aripiprazole is partially metabolized by CYP3A4, increased aripiprazole blood levels may occur when the drug is coadministered with inhibitors of CYP3A4 such as erythromycin. If these agents are used in combination, the patient should be carefully monitored for aripiprazole-related adverse reactions. Interactions with potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 such as erythromycin are possible.

    However, because armodafinil is itself an inducer of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme, drug interactions due to CYP3A4 inhibition by other medications may be complex and difficult to predict. Observation of the patient for increased effects from armodafinil may be needed. Major Concurrent use of arsenic trioxide and erythromycin should be avoided due to an increased risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP. If possible, erythromycin should be discontinued prior to initiating arsenic trioxide therapy.

    QT prolongation should be expected with the administration of arsenic trioxide. TdP and complete atrioventricular block have been reported. Erythromycin is also associated with QT prolongation and TdP. Major Avoid coadministration of artemether and erythromycin due to the increased potential of QT prolongation. Consider ECG monitoring if erythromycin must be used with or after artemether treatment. Additionally, erythromycin is an inhibitor of CYP3A4 and artemether is a substrate of CYP3A4; therefore, coadministration may lead to increased concentrations of artemether.

    Major Avoid coadministration of lumefantrine and erythromycin due to the increased potential of QT prolongation. Consider ECG monitoring if erythromycin must be used with or after lumefantrine treatment. Additionally, erythromycin is an inhibitor of CYP3A4 and lumefantrine is a substrate of CYP3A4; therefore, coadministration may lead to increased concentrations of lumefantrine. Major Asenapine has been associated with QT prolongation.

    According to the manufacturer, asenapine should be avoided in combination with other agents also known to have this effect e. Erythromycin administration is associated with QT prolongation and torsades de pointes TdP. Moderate Monitor for evidence of myopathy during coadministration of pravastatin and erythromycin. With concurrent therapy of erythromycin, the risk of myopathy increases. The pravastatin labeling recommends caution during concurrent use.

    Major Avoid concurrent use of erythromycin with regimens containing cobicistat and atazanavir or darunavir; use of an alternative antibiotic is recommended.

    Taking these drugs together may result in elevated concentations of erythromycin, cobicistat, atazanavir and darunavir. Major QT prolongation has occurred during therapeutic use of atomoxetine and following overdose. Atomoxetine is considered a drug with a possible risk of torsade de pointes TdP.

    Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with atomoxetine include erythromycin. Use these drugs in combination should be avoided. Major Do not exceed an avanfil dose of 50 mg once every 24 hours during coadministration with erythromycin as avanafil serum conentrations may be increased. Erythromycin increased avanafil Cmax and AUC equal to approximately 2-fold and 3-fold, respectively, and prolonged the half-life of avanafil to approximately 8 hours in a clinical study.

    Minor Coadministration of orally administered azelastine 4 mg twice daily with erythromycin mg three times daily for 7 days resulted in a slightly lower Cmax and a slightly higher AUC for azelastine compared to azelastine alone.

    The clinical relevance is unknown. Major Avoid use of azithromycin and erythromycin together as this would be considered duplicate therapy. Cross-resistance with gram-positive organisms would be expected. Additionally, the risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP increases if these drugs are administered together.

    Erythromycin has been associated with QT prolongation and TdP, and cases of QT prolongation and TdP have been reported during post-marketing use of azithromycin. Major Concurrent use of bedaquiline and a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor, such as erythromycin, for more than 14 days should be avoided unless the benefits justify the risks.

    When administered together, erythromycin may inhibit the metabolism of bedaquiline resulting in increased systemic exposure AUC and potentially more adverse reactions. Furthermore, since both drugs are associated with QT prolongation, coadministration may result in additive prolongation of the QT interval.

    Prior to initiating bedaquiline, obtain serum electrolyte concentrations and a baseline ECG. An ECG should also be performed at least 2, 12, and 24 weeks after starting bedaquiline therapy. An interaction with topically applied erythromycin is not expected. Belladonna Alkaloids; Ergotamine; Phenobarbital: Severe The concurrent use of erythromycin and ergotamine is contraindicated due to the risk for ergot toxicity; severe vasospastic adverse events, including extremity ischemia that may require amputation, can occur.

    Erythromycin inhibits the hepatic clearance of ergotamine via inhibition of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. Rare cases of cerebral ischemia, which may result in death, have also been reported when ergotamine was administered with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors.

    Severe According to the manufacturer, bepridil is contraindicated for use with drugs that prolong the QT interval due to the risk of torsades de pointes, including erythromycin. Major Avoid betrixaban use in patients with severe renal impairment receiving erythromycin. Reduce betrixaban dosage to 80 mg PO once followed by 40 mg PO once daily in all other patients receiving erythromycin.

    Bleeding risk may be increased; monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Betrixaban is a substrate of P-gp; erythromycin inhibits P-gp. Major Bicalutamide is metabolized by cytochrome P 3A4. Substances that are potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 activity, such as erythromycin, decrease the metabolism of bicalutamide and increase bicalutamide concentrations.

    This increase may be clinically relevant as adverse reactions to bicalutamide are related to dose and exposure Bismuth Subcitrate Potassium; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: Major Potential QT prolongation has been reported in limited case reports with metronidazole. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with metronidazole include erythromycin.

    Bismuth Subsalicylate; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: Minor Erythromycin can inhibit the hepatic metabolism of other drugs, such as borezomib, increasing their serum concentrations and potentially causing toxicity.

    If therapy with erythromycin is necessary, a reduction in the dose of bortezomib may be required. Such patients should be monitored carefully and lower doses should be used.

    Moderate Co-administration of bosentan with erythromycin, a CYP3A4 inhibitor, may increase the plasma concentrations of bosentan. The potential for increased bosentan effects should be monitored. The severity of this interaction is increased when erythromycin is combined with a potent CYP 2C9 inhibitor, like sulfisoxazole. Major Avoid concomitant use of bosutinib and erythromycin as bosutinib plasma exposure may be significantly increased resulting in an increased risk of bosutinib adverse events e.

    In a cross-over trial in 18 healthy volunteers, the Cmax and AUC values of bosutinib were increased 1. If erythromycin is used in combination with brexpiprazole and a moderate to strong CYP2D6 inhibitor, the brexpiprazole dose should be adjusted and the patient should be carefully monitored for brexpiprazole-related adverse reactions.

    Major Avoid coadministration of brigatinib with erythromycin if possible due to increased plasma exposure of brigatinib; an increase in brigatinib-related adverse reactions may occur. Major When bromocriptine is used for diabetes, do not exceed a dose of 1. Use this combination with caution in patients receiving bromocriptine for other indications. Concurrent use may increase bromocriptine concentrations. Moderate Avoid coadministration of oral budesonide and erythromycin due to the potential for increased budesonide exposure.

    Use caution with inhaled forms of budesonide as systemic exposure to the corticosteroid may also increase. In the presence of a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor, the systemic exposure to oral budesonide was increased by 8-fold. Major Due to the potential for QT prolongation, cautious use and close monitoring are advisable if concurrent use of erythromycin and buprenorphine is necessary. Buprenorphine has been associated with QT prolongation and has a possible risk of torsade de pointes TdP.

    Erythromycin also has a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP. FDA-approved labeling for some buprenorphine products recommend avoiding use with Class 1A and Class III antiarrhythmic medications while other labels recommend avoiding use with any drug that has the potential to prolong the QT interval.

    In addition, since the metabolism of buprenorphine is mediated by CYP3A4, co-administration of a CYP3A4 inhibitor such as erythromycin may decrease the clearance of buprenorphine resulting in prolonged or increased opioid effects. If co-administration is necessary, monitor patients for respiratory depression and sedation at frequent intervals and consider dose adjustments until stable drug effects are achieved. The effect of CYP3A4 inhibitors on buprenorphine implants has not been studied, and the effect may be dependent on the route of administration.

    Moderate Concomitant administration of erythromycin with buspirone may result in significant increases in buspirone AUC; the mechanism is probably reduced buspirone metabolism via CYP3A4. If the two drugs are to be used in combination, a low dose of buspirone is recommended. Subsequent dose adjustment of either drug should be based on clinical assessment.

    Minor Monitor for an increase in erythromycin-related adverse reactions if coadministration with cabozantinib is necessary. Erythromycin is a P-glycoprotein P-gp substrate. Cabozantinib is a P-gp inhibitor and has the potential to increase plasma concentrations of P-gp substrates; however, the clinical relevance of this finding is unknown.

    Moderate Consider a dose reduction of cannabidiol if coadministered with erythromycin. Coadministration may increase cannabidiol plasma concentrations increasing the risk of adverse reactions. Erythromycin inhibits CYP3A4 and may decrease carbamazepine metabolism and increase carbamazepine plasma concentrations. Moderate Entacapone should be given cautiously with drugs known to interfere with biliary excretion, glucuronidation or intestinal beta-glucuronidation such as erythromycin.

    Decreased biliary excretion of entacapone may occur if these agents are given concurrently. Monitoring for adverse effects, such as CNS effects and extrapyramidal symptoms, is advisable during coadministration.

    Moderate Increased concentrations of erythromycin may occur if it is coadministered with carvedilol; exercise caution. Carvedilol is a P-glycoprotein P-gp inhibitor and erythromycin is a P-gp substrate.

    Major Periodically monitor electrolytes and ECGs if coadministration of ceritinib and erythromycin is necessary; an interruption of ceritinib therapy, dose reduction, or discontinuation of therapy may be necessary if QT prolongation occurs. Ceritinib causes concentration-dependent prolongation of the QT interval. Erythromycin is associated with QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP.

    Inhibitors of these isoenzymes, such as erythromycin, would be expected to lead to an increase in cevimeline plasma concentrations. Major Concurrent use of chloroquine and erythromycin should be avoided due to an increased risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP. The need to coadminister these drugs should be done with a careful assessment of risks versus benefits.

    Both chloroquine and erythromycin have been associated with an increased risk of QT prolongation and TdP. Chlorpheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: Major Concurrent use of chlorpromazine and erythromycin should be avoided due to an increased risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP.

    This risk is generally higher at elevated drugs concentrations of phenothiazines. Chlorpromazine is specifically associated with an established risk of QT prolongation and TdP; case reports have included patients receiving therapeutic doses of chlorpromazine. Major Erythromycin can inhibit the hepatic metabolism of cilostazol, increasing it's serum concentrations and potentially causing toxicity.

    Subjects being treated with mg ketoconazole twice daily for 7 days received a single 90 mg cinacalcet dose on day 5 of therapy. The AUC and Cmax for cinacalcet increased 2.

    Therefore, caution is recommended when co-administering cinacalcet with other CYP3A4 enzyme inhibitors. These agents may include erythromycin.

    If a patient initiates or discontinues therapy with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor during cinacalcet therapy, the manufacturer recommends that dosage adjustment may be needed with close monitoring of PTH and serum calcium concentrations. Major Due to an increased risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP , caution is advised when administering erythromycin with ciprofloxacin.

    Ciprofloxacin is associated with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP and should be used cautiously with erythromycin. Severe QT prolongation and ventricular arrhythmias, including torsade de pointes TdP and death, have been reported with cisapride. Erythromycin administration is also associated with QT prolongation TdP. Because of the potential for TdP, use of erythromycin with cisapride is contraindicated.

    Major Concurrent use of citalopram and erythromycin should be avoided due to an increased risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP. If concurrent therapy is considered essential, ECG monitoring is recommended. Citalopram causes dose-dependent QT interval prolongation. Erythromycin is also associated with prolongation of the QT interval and TdP.

    Major Concomitant use of clindamycin and erythromycin is not recommended. Clindamycin competes with erythromycin for binding with the 50 S ribosomal subunits and can antagonize the effects of erythromycin. Additionally, concurrent use may decrease clindamycin clearance and increase the risk of adverse reactions. Moderate Erythromycin may inhibit the CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of oxidized benzodiazepines, such as clonazepam.

    Monitor patient clinically for enhanced clonazepam response. Moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as erythromycin, may reduce the metabolism of clorazepate and increase the potential for benzodiazepine toxicity. Major Concurrent use of erythromycin and clozapine should be avoided if possible.

    Treatment with clozapine has been associated with QT prolongation, torsade de pointes TdP , cardiac arrest, and sudden death and erythromycin has an established risk of QT prolongation and TdP. A case report has documented increased serum clozapine concentrations and the occurrence of a seizure when erythromycin was added to a stable dose of clozapine. Erythromycin is an inhibitor of CYP3A4, one of the isoenzymes responsible for the metabolism of clozapine.

    Elevated plasma concentrations of clozapine occurring through CYP inhibition may potentially increase the risk of life-threatening arrhythmias, sedation, anticholinergic effects, seizures, orthostasis, or other adverse effects. According to the manufacturer, patients receiving clozapine in combination with an inhibitor of CYP3A4 should be monitored for adverse reactions.

    Consideration should be given to reducing the clozapine dose if necessary. If the inhibitor is discontinued after dose adjustments are made, monitor for lack of clozapine effectiveness and consider increasing the clozapine dose if necessary.

    Cobicistat; Elvitegravir; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Alafenamide: Moderate Caution is advised when administering tenofovir, PMPA, a P-glycoprotein P-gp substrate, concurrently with inhibitors of P-gp, such as erythromycin.

    Coadministration may result in increased absorption of tenofovir. Monitor for tenofovir-associated adverse reactions.

    Major Avoid the concurrent use of cobimetinib with chronic erythromycin therapy due to the risk of cobimetinib toxicity. If concurrent short-term 14 days or less use of erythromycin is unavoidable, reduce the dose of cobimetinib to 20 mg once daily for patients normally taking 60 mg daily; after discontinuation of erythromycin, resume cobimetinib at the previous dose.

    Use an alternative to erythromycin in patients who are already taking a reduced dose of cobimetinib 40 or 20 mg daily. Major Promethazine carries a possible risk of QT prolongation. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with promethazine include erythromycin. Major Due to the risk for serious colchicine toxicity including multi-organ failure and death, avoid coadministration of colchicine and erythromycin in patients with normal renal and hepatic function unless the use of both agents is imperative.

    Coadministration is contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment because colchicine accumulation may be greater in these populations. Erythromycin can inhibit colchicine's metabolism via P-glycoprotein P-gp and CYP3A4, resulting in increased colchicine exposure.

    If coadministration in patients with normal renal and hepatic function cannot be avoided, adjust the dose of colchicine by either reducing the daily dose or the dosage frequency, and carefully monitor for colchicine toxicity. Specific dosage adjustment recommendations are available for the Colcrys product for patients who have taken erythromycin in the past 14 days or require concurrent use: Coadministration may result in elevated concentrations of conivaptan.

    Drugs that inhibit CYP3A4 such as erythromycin may increase plasma concentrations of estrogens and cause estrogen-related side effects such as nausea, breast tenderness, and endometrial hyperplasia.

    Patients receiving estrogens should be monitored for an increase in adverse events. Major Avoid coadministration of crizotinib with erythromycin due to the risk of QT prolongation; crizotinib exposure may also increase. If concomitant use is unavoidable, monitor for an increase in crizotinib-related adverse reactions, monitor ECGs for QT prolongation, and monitor electrolytes.

    An interruption of therapy, dose reduction, or discontinuation of therapy may be necessary for crizotinib if QT prolongation occurs. Major Erythromycin may inhibit the metabolism of cyclosporine via inhibition of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme, thus increasing cyclosporine's effects and the potential for toxicity.

    Additionally, erythromycin has been associated with inhibition of P-glycoprotein, which leads to decreased intestinal metabolism and increased oral absorption of cyclosporine. Increased cyclosporine concentrations may be seen with 2 days of beginning combination therapy. In managing potential interactions between macrolides and cyclosporine, appropriate monitoring of cyclosporine concentrations is critical to help avoid graft failure or drug-related toxicity. Moderate Increased serum concentrations of dabigatran are possible when dabigatran, a P-glycoprotein P-gp substrate, is coadministered with erythromycin, a P-gp inhibitor.

    Patients should be monitored for increased adverse effects of dabigatran. P-gp inhibition and renal impairment are the major independent factors that result in increased exposure to dabigatran. In addition, the therapeutic effects of erythromycin, a P-glycoprotein P-gp substrate, may be increased by daclatasvir, a P-gp inhibitor. If these drugs are administered together, monitor patients for adverse effects, such as headache, fatigue, nausea, and diarrhea. The manufacturer does not recommend daclatasvir dose reduction for adverse reactions.

    Patients should be monitored for increased side effects. Darunavir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir alafenamide: Dasabuvir; Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: Moderate Caution is warranted with the use of erythromycin and dasabuvir as concurrent administration may result in elevated plasma concentrations of dasabuvir. Monitor for adverse events such as gastrointestinal and skin reactions.

    Erythromycin is an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein P-gp and dasabuvir is a P-gp substrate. Moderate Caution is warranted with the use of erythromycin and ombitasvir as concurrent administration may result in elevated plasma concentrations of ombitasvir.

    Erythromycin is an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein P-gp and ombitasvir is a P-gp substrate. Moderate Caution is warranted with the use of erythromycin and paritaprevir as concurrent administration may result in elevated plasma concentrations of paritaprevir. Moderate Caution is warranted with the use of erythromycin and ritonavir as erythromycin may increase ritonavir serum concentrations resulting in increased treatment-related adverse effects.

    Major Monitor for evidence of QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP if coadministration of dasatinib and erythromycin is necessary. In vitro studies have shown that dasatinib has the potential to prolong the QT interval. Major Decrease deflazacort dose to one third of the recommended dosage when coadministered with erythromycin. Concurrent use may significantly increase concentrations of desDFZ, the active metabolite of deflazacort, resulting in an increased risk of toxicity.

    Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously with erythromycin include degarelix. Clinically relevant QTc prolongation may occur with deutetrabenazine.

    Moderate Caution is warranted with the use of dexamethasone and erythromycin. Erythromycin inhibits CYP3A4 and has the potential to result in increased plasma concentrations of corticosteroids such as dexamethasone. In addition to potential pharmacokinetic interactions, erythromycin may cause QT prolongation and exhibit additive electrophysiologic effects with quinidine. Concurrent use of erythromycin with procainamide should be avoided. In addition, erythromycin may theoretically increase plasma concentrations of quinidine via inhibition of CYP3A4.

    Moderate Erythromycin may inhibit the CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of oxidized benzodiazepines, such as diazepam. Monitor patient clinically for enhanced response from diazepam. Minor As erythromycin inhibits CYP3A4 activity, serum estrogen concentrations and estrogenic-related side effects e. Originally, this interaction was thought to be due to inhibition of intestinal flora, which leads to decreased intestinal metabolism of digoxin to inactive digoxin reduction products DRPs.

    A more important factor is erythromycin inhibition of P-glycoprotein P-gp , an energy-dependent drug efflux pump. Digoxin is a P-gp substrate. Inhibition of this protein in the intestinal cell wall leads to increased oral absorption and decreased renal and non-renal clearance of digoxin. Measure serum digoxin concentrations before initiating erythromycin. Severe Coadministration is contraindicated as ergot toxicity can occur, resulting in ischemic reactions and peripheral vasospasm.

    Erythromycin inhibits the hepatic clearance of dihydroergotamine via inhibition of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. Major Cases of life-threatening interactions have been reported for disopyramide when given with erythromycin.

    In vitro studies have shown that erythromycin inhibits the metabolism of disopyramide. Avoid the coadministration of disopyramide with agents that are associated with QT interval prolongation, including erythromycin.

    Disopyramide and erythromycin interact both pharmacokinetically and pharmacodynamically. In two patients, erythromycin caused disopyramide serum concentrations to rise significantly, which was associated with development of QT prolongation and tachyarrhythmias.

    Also, the antimuscarinic actions of disopyramide can interfere with the motility-enhancing properties of erythromycin in patients receiving erythromycin for this purpose.

    Erythromycin is a CYP3A4 inhibitor. In vitro studies have shown drugs that inhibit, induce, or are also metabolized by CYP3A enzymes can significantly affect the metabolism of docetaxel. The ketoconazole dosage was mg once daily for 3 days.

    However, there was large interpatient variability in the reduction in clearance. Use docetaxel cautiously when administered concurrently with inducers or inhibitors of CYP3A enzymes.

    Severe The concomitant use of erythromycin and dofetilide is contraindicated. In addition, erythromycin may theoretically increase plasma concentrations of dofetilide via inhibition of CYP3A4. Major Due to a possible risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP , dolasetron and erythromycin should be used together cautiously.

    Concurrent use may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Major Close clinical monitoring is advised when administering erythromycin with rilpivirine due to an increased potential for rilpivirine-related adverse events, including QT prolongation.

    When possible, alternative antibiotics should be considered. Predictions about the interaction can be made based on metabolic pathways. Erythromycin is an inhibitor of the hepatic isoenzyme CYP3A4; rilpivirine is metabolized by this isoenzyme.

    Coadministration may result in increased rilpivirine plasma concentrations. Major Case reports indicate that QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP can occur during donepezil therapy. Donepezil is considered a drug with a known risk of TdP. Erythromycin has a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP and use of erythromycin should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with donepezil.

    In addition, donepezil is partially metabolized by CYP3A4 and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as erythromycin, may increase donepezil concentrations, potentially resulting in dose-related toxicity. However, the clinical effect of such an interaction on the response to donepezil has not been determined.

    Doravirine; Lamivudine; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: Moderate CYP enzyme inhibitors, like erythromycin, may inhibit the hydroxylation of doxercalciferol, thereby decreasing the formation of the active metabolite and thus, decreasing efficacy. Patients should be monitored for a decrease in efficacy if CYP inhibitors are coadministered with doxercalciferol.

    Major Avoid coadministration of erythromycin with doxorubicin due to increased systemic exposure of doxorubicin resulting in increased treatment-related adverse reactions. Concurrent use of CYP3A4 or P-gp inhibitors with doxorubicin has resulted in clinically significant interactions. Major Use caution if coadministration of dronabinol with erythromycin is necessary, and monitor for an increase in dronabinol-related adverse reactions e. Concomitant use may result in elevated plasma concentrations of dronabinol.

    Severe Concomitant use of dronedarone and erythromycin is contraindicated. Dronedarone administration is associated with a dose-related increase in the QTc interval. The increase in QTc is approximately 10 milliseconds at doses of mg twice daily the FDA-approved dose and up to 25 milliseconds at doses of mg twice daily.

    Although there are no studies examining the effects of dronedarone in patients receiving other QT prolonging drugs, coadministration of such drugs may result in additive QT prolongation. Major Droperidol should be administered with extreme caution to patients receiving other agents that may prolong the QT interval. Droperidol administration is associated with an established risk for QT prolongation and torsades de pointes TdP.

    Any drug known to have potential to prolong the QT interval should not be coadministered with droperidol. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously with droperidol include erythromycin.

    The clearance of dutasteride may be reduced when co-administered with CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as erythromycin. Moderate Use caution when administering tamsulosin with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor such as erythromycin. Tamsulosin is extensively metabolized by CYP3A4 hepatic enzymes. In clinical evaluation, concomitant treatment with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor resulted in significant increases in tamsulosin exposure; interactions with moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors have not been evaluated.

    If concomitant use in necessary, monitor patient closely for increased side effects. Moderate Monitor for increased toxicity of duvelisib if coadministered with erythromycin.

    Coadministration may increase the exposure of duvelisib. No dosage adjustment is required in patients with atrial fibrillation. Edoxaban is a P-glycoprotein P-gp substrate and erythromycin is a P-gp inhibitor. Increased concentrations of edoxaban may occur during concomitant use of erythromycin; monitor for increased adverse effects of edoxaban.

    Major Consider alternative therapy as the coadministration of efavirenz and erythromycin may increase the risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP. QT prolongation has been observed with use of efavirenz.

    In addition, concurrent use may increase the systemic concentration of efavirenz as efavirenz is a CYP3A4 substrate, while erythromycin is a CYP3A4 inhibitor. Efavirenz; Lamivudine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: Severe Concomitant use of elagolix and strong organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP 1B1 inhibitors such as erythromycin is contraindicated.

    Increased elagolix concentrations increase the risk for dose-related side effects, including loss of bone mineral density. Consider an alternative to erythromycin in a patient receiving elagolix.

    Moderate Administering elbasvir; grazoprevir with erythromycin may cause the plasma concentrations of all three drugs to increase; thereby increasing the potential for adverse effects i. Erythromycin is a substrate and moderate inhibitor of CYP3A. If these drugs are used together, closely monitor for signs of hepatotoxicity. Moderate Monitor for increased eletriptan-related adverse effects if coadministered with erythromycin. Coadministration of erythromycin increased the eletriptan AUC by 4-fold in a drug interaction study.

    Major In intermediate or poor CYP2D6 metabolizers IMs or PMs , coadministration of erythromycin including erythromycin; sulfisoxazole and eliglustat is not recommended. The coadministration of eliglustat with both erythromycin and a moderate or strong CYP2D6 inhibitor is contraindicated in all patients.

    For the 50 gram pump only, reassemble jar with pump dispenser. Acanya and Onexton Topical Gel: Prior to dispensing, store in a refrigerator between 2—8 degrees C 36—46 degrees F. Dispense with a 10 week expiration date and instruct the patient to store at room temperature up to 25 degrees C 77 degrees F.

    Benzoyl peroxide has been shown to be a tumor promoter and progression agent in a number of animal studies. The clinical significance of this is unknown. Benzoyl peroxide in acetone at doses of 5 and 10 mg administered twice per week induced squamous cell skin tumors in transgenic TgAC mice in a study using 20 weeks of topical treatment. Genotoxicity studies were not conducted with benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin.

    Clindamycin phosphate was not genotoxic in Salmonella typhimurium or in a rat micronucleus test. Benzoyl peroxide has been found to cause DNA strand breaks in a variety of mammalian cell types, to be mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium tests by some but not all investigators, and to cause sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Studies have not been performed with benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin or benzoyl peroxide to evaluate the effect on fertility. The risk versus benefit should be considered prior to using a benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin combination in patient with benzoic acid hypersensitivity. Cross-sensitivity may occur in patients sensitive to benzoic acid derivatives e. Benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin products are contraindicated in patients with clindamycin hypersensitivity or lincomycin hypersensitivity or hypersensitivity to any other components of the product.

    Avoid accidental exposure of benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin products to the eyes, lips, mucus membranes and inflamed or raw skin due to severe irritation. If unintended mucus membrane or ocular exposure occurs, thoroughly rinse affected areas with water. Use of these products in patients with skin disease such as dermatitis, seborrhea, and eczema or with skin abrasion or inflammation, denuded skin including sunburn or windburn may increase the risk of skin irritation.

    The drug should be discontinued until skin sensitivity resolves. Patients should limit their sunlight UV exposure while using this drug product to decrease the risk for skin irritation. If mild to moderate itching, redness, swelling or dryness occurs, apply a moisturizer daily. If severe itching, redness, swelling or undue dryness occurs, consult health care provider and discontinue use. Safe and effective use of benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin in neonates, infants, and children younger than 12 years of age has not been established.

    Avoid use in this patient population. Benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin combination products are contraindicated in patients with a history of regional enteritis Crohn's disease , antibiotic-associated colitis, ulcerative colitis, or pseudomembranous colitis.

    Orally and parenterally administered clindamycin has been associated with severe colitis which may result in patient death. Almost all antibacterial agents have been associated with pseudomembranous colitis antibiotic-associated colitis which may range in severity from mild to life-threatening. In the colon, overgrowth of Clostridia may exist when normal flora is altered subsequent to antibacterial administration. The toxin produced by Clostridium difficile is a primary cause of pseudomembranous colitis.

    It is known that systemic use of antibiotics predisposes patients to development of pseudomembranous colitis. Consideration should be given to the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis in patients presenting with diarrhea following antibacterial administration. Systemic antibiotics should be prescribed with caution to patients with inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or other GI disease.

    If diarrhea develops during therapy, the drug should be discontinued. Following diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis, therapeutic measures should be instituted. In milder cases, the colitis may respond to discontinuation of the offending agent. In moderate to severe cases, fluids and electrolytes, protein supplementation, and treatment with an antibacterial effective against Clostridium difficile may be warranted. Products inhibiting peristalsis are contraindicated in this clinical situation.

    Practitioners should be aware that antibiotic-associated colitis has been observed to occur over two months or more following discontinuation of systemic antibiotic therapy; a careful medical history should be taken. There are no well-controlled studies of benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin combination products in pregnant women and it is unknown if they can cause fetal harm when administered during pregnancy.

    Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with topical application of these combinations. It is not known whether benzoyl peroxide; clindamycin is secreted into human milk after topical application; however, little systemic exposure occurs after topical application of these products.

    Orally and parenterally administered clindamycin has been reported to appear in breast milk. The American Academy of Pediatrics generally considers the use of clindamycin to be compatible with breast-feeding.

    Only water-miscible cream products should be applied to the breast because ointments may expose the infant to high levels of mineral paraffins.

    Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally administered drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    Moderate Benzoyl peroxide can potentiate the skin irritation caused by topical tretinoin. Concurrent application of these agents on areas treated with tretinoin should be avoided. Minor Keratolytic agents or products that contain keratolytic agents, such as benzoyl peroxide, can potentiate the skin irritation caused by hydroquinone and hydroquinone-containing products.

    Also, concurrent use of topical hydroquinone and topical peroxide e. Removal of staining can be accomplished by discontinuing concurrent use and by normal soap cleansing. Concurrent application of such agents should generally be avoided. Moderate Benzoyl peroxide will cause additive irritant and drying effects with concomitant oral isotretinoin use. Reduction in the dose or temporary discontinuation of the benzoyl peroxide product may be needed until skin irritation resolves.

    Moderate Mequinol; tretinoin Solage solution contains a high concentration of ethanol which may be very drying to the skin. Moderate Concurrent use of benzoyl peroxide and topical products containing salicylic acid on the same area of skin will cause additive irritant and drying effects. Moderate When concomitantly prescribed for acne therapy, apply salicylic acid and clindamycin topical solutions separately, at different times of the day to minimize skin irritation, unless directed otherwise by the prescriber.

    If skin irritation occurs, a decrease in dose or frequency of one or both agents may be necessary. Sodium Thiosulfate; Salicylic Acid:

    Adapalene and Benzoyl Peroxide Gel

    ACANYA (clindamycin phosphate and benzoyl peroxide) Gel, %/% is a . Severe colitis has occurred following oral and parenteral administration of. If you are using a cream, foam, lotion, or gel, apply it to the affected area as directed, usually once or twice a day. Before applying each dose, gently wash the . Feb 15, Ketoprofen gel can cause your skin to become more sensitive to sunlight . by accident, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Manufacturer's PIL, Powergel % gel, A. Menarini Farmaceutica.

    Before using ketoprofen gel



    Comments

    elrat14

    ACANYA (clindamycin phosphate and benzoyl peroxide) Gel, %/% is a . Severe colitis has occurred following oral and parenteral administration of.

    hanteruga

    If you are using a cream, foam, lotion, or gel, apply it to the affected area as directed, usually once or twice a day. Before applying each dose, gently wash the .

    kkk44

    Feb 15, Ketoprofen gel can cause your skin to become more sensitive to sunlight . by accident, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Manufacturer's PIL, Powergel % gel, A. Menarini Farmaceutica.

    zikeR

    Children younger than 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For topical dosage forms (cleansing lotion, cream, or gel).

    pavlopavly

    EPIDUO® FORTE (adapalene and benzoyl peroxide) gel, %/% is . milk, caution should be exercised when EPIDUO FORTE gel is administered to a.

    yshel

    EPIDUO Gel. EPIDUO® (adapalene and benzoyl peroxide) Gel %/%. For topical use 2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION. 3 DOSAGE FORMS AND.

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