Legal High Statistics Uk 2015

Content:
  • Deaths from legal highs have tripled in two years as Government prepares crackdown
  • Deaths involving legal highs in England and Wales - Office for National Statistics
  • Deaths from 'legal highs' - Office for National Statistics
  • Rise in deaths from 'legal highs' in the UK - BBC News
  • Black Mamba in Wolverhampton

    Deaths from legal highs have tripled in two years as Government prepares crackdown

    legal high statistics uk 2015 The Psychoactive Substances Act will outlaw the importation, production and supply of psychoactive substances, although alcohol, tobacco, caffeine and most medicines will be exempt. There is no agreed official list of substances that are categorised as legal highs, but this article concentrates on the following types of substances:. This article focuses on substances staatistics were not controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act legal high statistics uk 2015 the day the person died. However, it has been difficult to control the use of NPS dbol test prop cycle existing legislation, and the number on the market has increased rapidly in recent years. There were 76 deaths involving 'legal highs' ie an NPS not controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act on the day the person diedin England and Wales between and stattistics Over the same period there were more than times as many deaths involving heroin or jk 7, and more than 20 times as many legal high statistics uk 2015 involving cocaine 1,

    Deaths involving legal highs in England and Wales - Office for National Statistics

    legal high statistics uk 2015

    These are external links and will open in a new window. The number of UK deaths linked to so-called "legal highs" has risen in recent years - from 10 in to at least 68 in , figures show. Designed to mimic the effects of illegal drugs, "legal highs" are chemically different enough to not be covered by the law.

    The chemicals - known as New Psychoactive Substances NPS - are made on an industrial scale in countries like China and India and then packaged and distributed throughout Europe. Suppliers can sell many of them legally as long as they write "not for human consumption" on the packets. They are often sold as plant food or bath salts. But often new versions are then cooked up and come on sale almost immediately after a ban comes into place.

    Richard Phillips, 26, has been left severely brain damaged after taking the now banned LSD copycat drug N-Bomb at a party. He had been drinking and tiny traces of cocaine were also found in his body.

    Doctors told his family that it was probably the cocktail of alcohol and N-Bomb that triggered a series of fits. His brother Byron Phillips said: He had a massive heart. He was a loving father and was loved by everyone he met. His family believe he got the so called "legal high" from a friend who had bought the substance online back in May last year, just a month before the government banned N-Bomb.

    He can hold his head up and move his arms but that's about as far as it goes. He can breathe for himself but he is fed through a peg in his stomach," said Byron. They did not include all post-mortem examinations, so the authors say the number of deaths linked to NPS is probably higher than the 68 recorded in The reporting system is voluntary, and while most coroner regions provide data, not all do.

    John Corkery, co-author of the report, said: The government said it was leading the way globally in dealing with the fast moving industry but drugs minister Norman Baker admitted it was a challenge keeping up. He has ordered a review into current laws which is expected to report back in the summer. So the phrase "legal highs" is a misnomer. For Byron though, more needs to be done to warn people of the risks of these completely untested substances. I wish he just had a few beers, and I wish he hadn't taken that extra step.

    I don't know why he did and I will never know, because I can't ask him - or at least he can't tell me why. She tells leaders it is her "sincere wish" for Prince Charles to be the next head of the Commonwealth. Image caption Richard Phillips right with his brother Byron, was left brain damaged after taking a legal high The number of UK deaths linked to so-called "legal highs" has risen in recent years - from 10 in to at least 68 in , figures show.

    They are on sale openly on websites and high streets across the UK. Media playback is unsupported on your device. More on this story. UK opts out of EU 'legal highs' plan. Video Concern over dangers of 'legal highs'. See inside Welsh drug testing centre. National Programme on Substance Abuse Deaths. Top Stories Queen wants Charles to lead Commonwealth She tells leaders it is her "sincere wish" for Prince Charles to be the next head of the Commonwealth.

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    Deaths from 'legal highs' - Office for National Statistics

    legal high statistics uk 2015

    Rise in deaths from 'legal highs' in the UK - BBC News

    legal high statistics uk 2015

    legal high statistics uk 2015