Anabolic Steroids Research Study

Content:
  • Study links steroid abuse to key biological, psychological characteristics
  • Medical Issues Associated with Anabolic Steroid Use: Are They Exaggerated?
  • The Scientific Side of Steroid Use and Abuse | Dartmouth News
  • HEALTH - Research Report Series: Anabolic Steroid Abuse
  • Study links steroid abuse to key biological, psychological characteristics – Harvard Gazette
  • BBC World News Anabolic steroids interview

    Study links steroid abuse to key biological, psychological characteristics

    anabolic steroids research study Androgenic-anabolic steroids AAS are synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone. They can anabolic steroids research study strong effects on the human body that may be beneficial for athletic anabolic steroids research study. A review of the literature revealed that most laboratory studies did not investigate the actual doses of AAS currently abused in the field. Therefore, those studies may not reflect the actual adverse effects of steroids. The available scientific literature describes that short-term administration of these drugs by athletes can increase strength and bodyweight. A reduction of fat mass does not seem to occur. Although AAS administration may affect erythropoiesis and blood haemoglobin concentrations, no effect on endurance performance was genesis deca 300.

    Medical Issues Associated with Anabolic Steroid Use: Are They Exaggerated?

    anabolic steroids research study

    Leslie Henderson is concerned about steroid abuse, not necessarily by sports luminaries like Barry Bonds and Mark McGwire, but rather by adolescents. She is also the senior associate dean for faculty affairs at Geisel. Postdoctoral Research Associate Joseph Oberlander and Professor Leslie Henderson examine patterns of electrical activity action potentials recorded from brains of mice exposed to anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Chronic steroid exposure changes patterns of activity in regions of the brain that are critical for the expression of anxiety. Henderson reports that websites targeting steroid users often acknowledge that steroids can affect your body—that's why they are taken—or they can make you aggressive.

    However, they do not say anything about changing the way your brain works. The drugs of concern are anabolic-androgenic steroids AAS , which are synthetic derivatives of testosterone, originally designed to provide enhanced anabolic tissue-building potency with negligible androgenic masculinizing effects, according to Henderson and her long-time Dartmouth collaborator Ann Clark, a professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. In addition to the danger implicit in high dosages is the range of uncontrolled variability in the composition of these illicit synthetics.

    These changes are reflected in manifestations of anxiety, as seen in Henderson's laboratory experiments. However, little regard is given to these potential dangers when the primary objective is a competitive edge in athletic pursuits. Compounding these caveats are the implications of abuse at an early age.

    Studies have shown there are "critical periods"—periods of time during adolescence when exposure to steroids can impose permanent changes in both brain organization and function, leading to physiological and psychiatric effects that may still be prevalent even in middle age. The age at which you take them also affects their persistence. From studies using rodents as an animal model, other investigators have also found that, "if you take steroids as an adolescent, those effects are much longer lasting in terms of their negative effects on behavior, especially aggression, than if you take them as an adult," Henderson comments.

    In her laboratory work, Henderson has looked at three major behavioral systems typically associated with steroid abuse—reproduction, aggression in males, and anxiety in both sexes. When Henderson says "we" in reference to her research, she means the "royal we. In fact the past couple years we've had probably our best and most high-profile publications," says Henderson.

    As if she were not busy enough, Henderson is committed to active outreach—bringing science to the public. Skip to main content. News Photos Videos Social Events.

    The Scientific Side of Steroid Use and Abuse | Dartmouth News

    anabolic steroids research study

    HEALTH - Research Report Series: Anabolic Steroid Abuse

    anabolic steroids research study

    Study links steroid abuse to key biological, psychological characteristics – Harvard Gazette

    anabolic steroids research study